blog posts and news stories

Conference Season 2019

Are you staying warm this winter? Can’t wait for the spring? Us either, with spring conference season right around the corner! Find our Empirical team traveling bicoastally in these upcoming months.

We’re starting the season right in our backyard at the Bay Area Learning Analytics (BayLAN) Conference at Stanford University on March 2, 2019! CEO Denis Newman will be presenting on a panel on the importance of efficacy with Jeremy Roschelle of Digital Promise. Senior Research Scientist Valeriy Lazarev will also be attending the conference.

The next day, the team will be off to SXSW EDU in Austin, Texas! Our goal is to talk to people about the new venture, Evidentally.

Then we’re headed to Washington D.C. to attend the annual Society for Research on Educational Effectiveness (SREE) Conference! Andrew Jaciw will be presenting “A Study of the Impact of the CREATE Residency Program on Teacher Socio-Emotional and Self-Regulatory Outcomes”. We will be presenting on Friday March 8, 2:30 PM - 4:00 PM during the “Social and Emotional Learning in Education Settings” sessions in Ballroom 1. Denis will also be attending and with Andrew, meeting with many research colleagues. If you can’t catch us in D.C., you can find Andrew back in the Bay Area at the sixth annual Carnegie Foundation Summit.

For the last leg of spring conferences, we’ll be back at the American Educational Research Association’s Annual (AERA) Meeting in Toronto, Canada from April 6th to 9th. There you’ll be able to hear more about the CREATE Teacher Residency Research Study presented by Andrew Jaciw, joined by Vice President of Research Operations Jenna Zacamy along with our new Research Manager, Audra Wingard. And for the first time in 10 years, you won’t be finding Denis at AERA… Instead he’ll be at the ASU GSV Summit in San Diego, California!

2019-02-12

Evidentally, a New Company Taking on Edtech Efficacy Analytics

Empirical Education has launched Evidentally, Inc., a new company that specializes in helping edtech companies and their investors make more effective products. Founded by Denis Newman, CEO, and Val Lazarev, Chief Product Architect, the company conducts rapid cycle evaluations that meet the federal Every Student Succeeds Act standards for moderate and promising evidence. The efficacy analytics leverage the edtech product’s usage metrics to efficiently identify states and districts with sufficient usage to make impact studies feasible. Evidentally is actively servicing and securing initial clients, and is seeking seed funding to prepare for expansion. In the meantime, the company is being incubated by Empirical Education, which has transferred intellectual property relating to its R&D prototypes of the service and is providing staffing through a services agreement. The Evidentally team will be meeting with partners and investors at SXSW EDU, EdSurge Immersion, ASU GSV Summit, and ISTE. Let’s talk!

2019-02-06

Research on AMSTI Presented to the Alabama State Board of Education

On January 13, Dr. Eric Mackey, Alabama’s new State Superintendent of Education, presented our rapid cycle evaluation of Alabama Math, Science, and Technology Initiative (AMSTI). The study is based on results for the 2016-17 school year, for which outcome data were available at the time the Alabama State Department of Education (ALSDE) contracted with Empirical in July 2018.

AMSTI is ALSDE’s initiative to improve math and science teaching statewide; the program, which started over 20 years ago, now operates in over 900 schools across the state.

Our current project, led by Val Lazarev compares classes taught by teachers who were fully trained in AMSTI with matched classrooms taught by teachers with no AMSTI training. The overall results, shown in the above graph were similar in magnitude to Empirical’s 2012 study directed by Denis Newman and designed by Empirical’s Chief Scientist, Andrew Jaciw. That cluster-randomized trial, which involved 82 schools and ~700 teachers, showed AMSTI had a small overall positive effect. The earlier study also showed that AMSTI may be exacerbating the achievement gap between black and white students. Since ALSDE was also interested in information that could improve AMSTI, the current study examined a number of subgroup impacts. In this project we did not find a difference between the value of AMSTI for black and white students. We did find a strong benefit for females in science. And for English learners, there was a negative effect of being in a science class of an AMSTI-trained teacher. The state board expressed concern and a commitment to using the results to guide improvement of the program.

Download both of the reports here.

2019-01-22
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