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IES Published Our REL Southwest Study on Trends in Teacher Mobility

The U.S. Department of Education’s Institute of Education Sciences published a report of a study we conducted for REL Southwest! We are thankful for the support and engagement we received from the Educator Effectiveness Research Alliance throughout the study.

The study was published in December 2017 and provides updated information regarding teacher mobility for Texas public schools during the 201112 through 201516 school years. Teacher mobility is defined as teachers changing schools or leaving the public school system.

In the report, descriptive information on mobility rates is presented at the regional and state levels for each school year. Mobility rates are disaggregated further into destination proportions to describe the proportion of teacher mobility due to within-district movement, between-district movement, and leaving Texas public schools. This study leverages data collected by the Texas Education Agency during the pilot of the Texas Teacher Evaluation and Support System (T-TESS) in 57 school districts in 201415. Analyses examine how components of the T-TESS observation rubric are related to school-level teacher mobility rates.

During the 2011-12 school year, 18.7% of Texas teachers moved schools within a district, moved between districts, or left the Texas Public School system. By 2015-16, this mobility rate had increased to 22%. Moving between districts was the primary driver of the increase in mobility rates. Results indicate significant links between mobility and teacher, student, and school demographic characteristics. Teachers with special education certifications left Texas public schools at nearly twice the rate of teachers with other teaching certifications. School-level mobility rates showed significant positive correlations with the proportion of special education, economically disadvantaged, low-performing, and minority students. School-level mobility rates were negatively correlated with the proportion of English learner students. Schools with higher overall observation ratings on the T-TESS rubric tended to have lower mobility rates.

Findings from this study will provide state and district policymakers in Texas with updated information about trends and correlates of mobility in the teaching workforce, and offer a systematic baseline for monitoring and planning for future changes. Informed by these findings, policymakers can formulate a more strategic and targeted approach for recruiting and retaining teachers. For instance, instead of using generic approaches to enhance the overall supply of teachers or improve recruitment, more targeted efforts to attract and retain teachers in specific subject areas (for example, special education), in certain stages of their career (for example, novice teachers), and in certain geographic areas are likely to be more productive. Moreover, this analysis may enrich the existing knowledge base about schools’ teacher retention and mobility in relation to the quality of their teaching force, or may inform policy discussions about the importance of a stable teaching force for teaching effectiveness.

2018-02-01

We Are Participating in the Upcoming REL Webinar on Teacher Mobility

Join Regional Educational Laboratories Midwest and Southwest for a free webinar on October 4 to learn how states can address teacher demand and mobility trends. As a partner in REL Southwest, we will be reporting on our work on teacher recruitment and retention in rural Oklahoma.

Teachers and administrators change schools for a variety of reasons. Mobility can be a positive if an educator moves to a position that is a better fit, but it can also have serious implications for states. Mobility may harm schools that serve high-need populations, and mobility can also create additional recruitment and hiring costs for districts.

This webinar focuses on research addressing the teacher pipeline and the mobility of teachers between schools and districts. Presenters will discuss two published REL Midwest research studies on teacher mobility trends and strategies for estimating teacher supply and demand. Following each presentation, leaders from the Oklahoma State Department of Education and the Minnesota Department of Education will respond to the presentations and share state initiatives to meet teacher staffing needs. Presenters also will briefly highlight two upcoming REL Southwest studies related to teacher supply and demand that are expected to be released later this year.

The studies that will be discussed are:
- An examination of the movement of educators within and across three Midwest Region states (REL Midwest, AIR)
- Strategies for estimating teacher supply and demand using student and teacher data (REL Midwest, AIR)
- Indicators of successful teacher recruitment and retention in Oklahoma rural schools (REL Southwest, Empirical Education)
- Teacher mobility in Texas: Trends and associations with student, teacher, and school characteristics (REL Southwest, AIR, Empirical Education)

This webinar is designed for state education staff, administrators in schools and districts with significant American Indian populations, American Indian community leaders, research alliance and community of practice members, and education researchers. If you cannot attend the live event, register at the link below to be notified when a recording of the webinar is available online.

Exploring Educator Movement Between Districts
October 4, 2017
10:00–11:30 a.m. PT

The Regional Educational Laboratories (RELs) build the capacity of educators to use data and research to improve student outcomes. Each REL responds to needs identified in its region and makes learning opportunities and other resources available to educators throughout the United States. The REL program is a part of the Institute of Education Sciences (IES) in the U.S. Department of Education. To receive regular updates on REL work, including events and reports, follow IES on Facebook and Twitter.

You can register for this event on the REL website.

2017-09-21

Work has Started on Analysis of Texas Educator Evaluation (T-TESS) Pilot

Empirical Education, through its contract with the REL Southwest, has begun the data collection process for an analysis of the Texas Teacher Evaluation and Support System (T-TESS) pilot conducted by the Texas Education Agency. This is announced on the IES site. Empirical’s Senior Research Scientist Val Lazarev is leading the analysis, which will focus on the elements and components of the system to better understand what T-TESS is measuring and provide alternative approaches to forming summative or composite scores.

2015-06-05

Report completed on the effectiveness of MathForward

Empirical Education assisted Richardson Independent School District (RISD) in conducting an evaluation of the MathForward algebra readiness program published by Texas Instruments. RISD implemented MathForward in their 7th and 8th grade general mathematics and 9th grade Algebra I classes. The research employed an interrupted time series design comparing existing student achievement scores with MathForward to student achievement scores from the three years prior to the introduction of MathForward.

The results of this four-year study suggest that 7th grade students scored, on average, 11 percentile points higher with MathForward than the 7th grade students from the three previous years without MathForward. A similar result for the 8th grade suggests that students participating in MathForward scored, on average, 9 percentile points higher. While the trend did not hold for 9th grade, further exploration suggests that 9th grade students whose teachers had 3 years experience using MathForward scored higher than 9th grade students whose teachers did not use MathForward.

The report further illustrates how an interrupted time series design can be used to study a program as it is rolled out over several years. This research will be presented at the 2010 AERA conference in Denver, Colorado (Friday, April 30 — Tuesday, May 4).

2009-11-13
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