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ETIN Releases Guidelines for Research on Educational Technologies in K-12 Schools

The press release (below) was originally published on the SIIA website. It has since inspired stories in the Huffington Post, edscoop, EdWeek’s Market Brief, and the EdSurge newsletter.



ETIN Releases Guidelines for Research on Educational Technologies in K-12 Schools

Changes in education technology and policy spur updated approach to industry research

Washington, DC (July 25, 2017)The Education Technology Industry Network, a division of The Software & Information Industry Association, released an important new report today: “Guidelines for Conducting and Reporting EdTech Impact Research in U.S. K-12 Schools.” Authored by Dr. Denis Newman and the research team at Empirical Education Inc., the Guidelines provide 16 best practice standards of research for publishers and developers of educational technologies.

The Guidelines are a response to the changing research methods and policies driven by the accelerating pace of development and passage of the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), which has challenged the static notion of evidence defined in NCLB. Recognizing the need for consensus among edtech providers, customers in the K-12 school market, and policy makers at all levels, SIIA is making these Guidelines freely available.

“SIIA members recognize that changes in technology and policy have made evidence of impact an increasingly critical differentiator in the marketplace,” said Bridget Foster, senior VP and managing director of ETIN. “The Guidelines show how research can be conducted and reported within a short timeframe and still contribute to continuous product improvement.”

“The Guidelines for research on edtech products is consistent with our approach to efficacy: that evidence of impact can lead to product improvement,” said Amar Kumar, senior vice president of Efficacy & Research at Pearson. “We appreciate ETIN’s leadership and Empirical Education’s efforts in putting together this clear presentation of how to use rigorous and relevant research to drive growth in the market.”

The Guidelines draw on over a decade of experience in conducting research in the context of the U.S. Department of Education’s Institute of Education Sciences, and its Investing in Innovation program.

“The current technology and policy environment provides an opportunity to transform how research is done,” said Dr. Newman, CEO of Empirical Education Inc. and lead author of the Guidelines. “Our goal in developing the new guidelines was to clarify current requirements in a way that will help edtech companies provide school districts with the evidence they need to consistently quantify the value of software tools. My thanks go to SIIA and the highly esteemed panel of reviewers whose contribution helped us provide the roadmap for the change that is needed.”

“In light of the ESSA evidence standards and the larger movement toward evidence-based reform, publishers and software developers are increasingly being called upon to show evidence that their products make a difference with children,” said Guidelines peer reviewer Dr. Robert Slavin, director of the Center for Research and Reform in Education, Johns Hopkins University. “The ETIN Guidelines provide practical, sensible guidance to those who are ready to meet these demands.”

ETIN’s goal is to improve the market for edtech products by advocating for greater transparency in reporting research findings. For that reason, it is actively working with government, policy organizations, foundations, and universities to gain the needed consensus for change.

“As digital instructional materials flood the market place, state and local leaders need access to evidence-based research regarding the effectiveness of products and services. This guide is a great step in supporting both the public and private sector to help ensure students and teachers have access to the most effective resources for learning,” stated Christine Fox, Deputy Executive Director, SETDA. The Guidelines can be downloaded here: https://www.empiricaleducation.com/research-guidelines.

2017-07-25

SIIA ETIN EIS Conference Presentations 2017


We are playing a major role in the Education Impact Symposium (EIS), organized by the Education Technology Industry Network (ETIN), a division of The Software & Information Industry Association (SIIA).

  1. ETIN is releasing a set of edtech research guidelines that CEO Denis Newman wrote this year
  2. Denis is speaking on 2 panels this year

The edtech research guidelines that Denis authored and ETIN is releasing on Tuesday, July 25 are called “Guidelines for Conducting and Reporting EdTech Impact Research in U.S. K-12 Schools” and can be downloaded from this webpage. The Guidelines are a much-needed response to a rapidly-changing environment of cloud-based technology and important policy changes brought about by the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA).

The panels Denis will be presenting on are both on Tuesday, July 25, 2017.

12:30 - 1:15pm
ETIN’s New Guidelines for Product Research in the ESSA Era
With the recent release of ETIN’s updated Guidelines for EdTech Impact Research, developers and publishers can ride the wave of change from NCLB’s sluggish concept of “scientifically-based” to ESSA’s dynamic view of “evidence” for continuous improvement. The Guidelines are being made publicly available at the Symposium, with a discussion and Q&A led by the lead author and some of the contributing reviewers.
Moderator:
Myron Cizdyn, Chief Executive Officer, The BLPS Group
Panelists:
Malvika Bhagwat, Research & Efficacy, Newsela
Amar Kumar, Sr. Vice President, Pearson
Denis Newman, CEO, Empirical Education Inc.
John Richards, President, Consulting Services for Education

2:30 - 3:30pm
The Many Faces of Impact
Key stakeholders in the EdTech Community will each review in Ted Talk style, what they are doing to increase impact of digital products, programs and services. Our line-up of presenters include:
- K-12 and HE content providers using impact data to better understand their customers improve their products, and support their marketing and sales teams
- an investor seeking impact on both disadvantaged populations and their financial return in order to make funding decisions for portfolio companies
- an education organization helping institutions decide what research is useful to them and how to grapple with new ESSA requirements
- a researcher working with product developers to produce evidence of the impact of their digital products

After the set of presenters have finished, we’ll have time for your questions on these multidimensional aspects of IMPACT and how technology can help.
Moderator:
Karen Billings, Principal, BillingsConnects
Panelists:
Jennifer Carolan, General Partner, Reach Capital
Christopher Cummings, VP, Institutional Product and Solution Design, Cengage
Melissa Greene, Director, Strategic Partnerships, SETDA
Denis Newman, CEO, Empirical Education Inc.
Kari Stubbs, PhD, Vice President, Learning & Innovation, BrainPOP

Jennifer Carolan, Denis Newman, and Chris Cummings on a panel at ETIN EIS

If you get a chance to check out the Guidelines before EIS, Denis would love to hear your thoughts about them at the conference.

2017-07-21

Empirical Releases Final Report on HMH Fuse™ iPad App

Today Empirical and Houghton Mifflin Harcourt made the following announcement. You can download the report and research summary from the study using the links below.
Fuse research report
Fuse research summary

Study Shows HMH Fuse™ iPad® App Can Dramatically Improve Student Achievement

Strong implementation in Riverside Unified School District associated with nine-point increase in percentile standing

BOSTON – April 10, 2012 – A study of HMH Fuse: Algebra 1 app released today by research firm Empirical Education Inc. identifies implementation as a key factor in the success of mobile technology. The 2010–2011 study was a pilot of a new educational app from global education leader Houghton Mifflin Harcourt (HMH) that re-imagines the conventional textbook to fully deploy interactive features of the mobile device. The HMH Fuse platform encourages the use of personalized lesson plans by combining direct instruction, ongoing support, assessment and intervention in one easy-to-use suite of tools.

Empirical found that the iPad-using students in the four participating districts: Long Beach, Fresno, San Francisco and Riverside Unified School District (Riverside Unified), performed on average as well as their peers using the traditional textbook. However, after examining its own results, Riverside Unified found an increase in test scores among students taught with HMH Fuse compared to their peers. Empirical corroborated these results, finding a statistically significant impact equivalent to a nine-point percentile increase. The Riverside Unified teachers also reported substantially greater usage of the HMH Fuse app both in teaching and by the students in class.

“Education technology does not operate in a vacuum, and the research findings reinforce that with a supportive school culture and strategic implementation, technology can have a significant impact on student achievement,” said Linda Zecher, President and CEO of HMH. “We’re encouraged by the results of the study and the potential of mobile learning to accelerate student achievement and deepen understanding in difficult to teach subjects like algebra.”

Across all districts, the study found a positive effect on student attitudes toward math, and those students with positive attitudes toward math achieved higher scores on the California Standards Test.

The research design was a “gold standard” randomized control trial that examined the performance of eighth-grade students during the 2010-2011 school year. Each teacher’s classes were randomly assigned to either the treatment group that used the HMH Fuse app or the control group that used the conventional print format of the same content.

“The rapid pace of mobile technology’s introduction into K-12 education leaves many educators with important questions about its efficacy especially given their own resources and experience,” said Denis Newman, CEO of Empirical Education. “The results from Riverside highlight the importance of future research on mobile technologies that account for differences in teacher experience and implementation.”

To access the full research report, go to www.empiricaleducation.com. A white paper detailing the implementation and impact of HMH Fuse in Riverside is available on the HMH website.

2012-04-10

Research Guidelines Re-released to Broader Audience

The updated guidelines for evaluation research were unveiled at the SIIA Ed Tech Business Forum, held in New York City on November 28 - 29. Authored by Empirical’s CEO, Denis Newman, and issued by the Software and Information Industry Association (SIIA), the guidelines seek to provide a standard of best practices for conducting and reporting evaluation studies for educational technologies in order to enhance the quality, credibility, and utility to education decision makers.

Denis introduced the guidelines during the “Meet the authors of SIIA Publications” session on November 29. Non-members will be able to purchase the guidelines from Selling to Schools starting Thursday, December 1, 2011 (with continued free access to SIIA members). UPDATE: Denis was interviewed by Glen McCandless of Selling to Schools on December 15, 2011 to discuss key aspects of the guidelines. Listen to the full interview here.

2011-12-05

Comment on the NY Times: In Classroom of Future, Stagnant Scores

The New York Times is running a series of front-page articles on “Grading the Digital School.” The first one ran Labor Day weekend and raised the question as to whether there’s any evidence that would persuade a school board or community to allocate extra funds for technology. With the demise of the Enhancing Education Through Technology (EETT) program, federal funds dedicated to technology will no longer be flowing into states and districts. Technology will have to be measured against any other discretionary purchase. The resulting internal debates within schools and their communities about the expense vs. value of technology promise to have interesting implications and are worth following closely.

The first article by Matt Richtel revisits a debate that has been going on for decades between those who see technology as the key to “21st Century learning” and those who point to the dearth of evidence that technology makes any measurable difference to learning. It’s time to try to reframe this discussion in terms of what can be measured. And in considering what to measure, and in honor of Labor Day, we raise a question that is often ignored: what role do teachers play in generating the measurable value of technology?

Let’s start with the most common argument in favor of technology, even in the absence of test score gains. The idea is that technology teaches skills “needed in a modern economy,” and these are not measured by the test scores used by state and federal accountability systems. Karen Cator, director of the U.S. Department of Education office of educational technology, is quoted as saying (in reference to the lack of improvement in test scores), “…look at all the other things students are doing: learning to use the Internet to research, learning to organize their work, learning to use professional writing tools, learning to collaborate with others.” Presumably, none of these things directly impact test scores. The problem with this perennial argument is that many other things that schools keep track of should provide indicators of improvement. If as a result of technology, students are more excited about learning or more engaged in collaborating, we could look for an improvement in attendance, a decrease in drop-outs, or students signing up for more challenging courses.

Information on student behavioral indicators is becoming easier to obtain since the standardization of state data systems. There are some basic study designs that use comparisons among students within the district or between those in the district and those elsewhere in the state. This approach uses statistical modeling to identify trends and control for demographic differences, but is not beyond the capabilities of many school district research departments1 or the resources available to the technology vendors. (Empirical has conducted research for many of the major technology providers, often focusing on results for a single district interested in obtaining evidence to support local decisions.) Using behavioral or other indicators, a district such as that in the Times article can answer its own questions. Data from the technology systems themselves can be used to identify users and non-users and to confirm the extent of usage and implementation. It is also valuable to examine whether some students (those in most need or those already doing okay) or some teachers (veterans or novices) receive greater benefit from the technology. This information may help the district focus resources where they do the most good.

A final thought about where to look for impacts of technologies comes from a graph of the school district’s budget. While spending on technology and salaries have both declined over the last three years, spending on salaries is still about 25 times as great as on technologies. Any discussion of where to find an impact of technology must consider labor costs, which are the district’s primary investment. We might ask whether a small investment in technology would allow the district to reduce the numbers of teachers by, for example, allowing a small increase in the number of students each teacher can productively handle. Alternatively, we might ask whether technology can make a teacher more effective, by whatever measures of effective teaching the district chooses to use, with their current students. We might ask whether technologies result in keeping young teachers on the job longer or encouraging initiative to take on more challenging assignments.

It may be a mistake to look for a direct impact of technology on test scores (aside from technologies aimed specifically at that goal), but it is also a mistake to assume the impact is, in principle, not measurable. We need a clear picture of how various technologies are expected to work and where we can look for the direct and indirect effects. An important role of technology in the modern economy is providing people with actionable evidence. It would be ironic if education technology was inherently opaque to educational decision makers.

1 Or we would hope, the New York Times. Sadly, the article provides a graph of trends in math and reading for the district highlighted in the story compared to trends for the state. The graphic is meant to show that the district is doing worse than the state average. But the article never suggests that we should consider the population of the particular district and whether it is doing better or worse than one would expect, controlling for demographics, available resources, and other characteristics.

2011-09-12

New Education Pilot Brings Apple’s iPad Into the Classroom

Above: Empirical Education President Denis Newman converses with Secretary Bonnie Reiss and author, Dr. Edward Burger

They’re not contest winners, but today, dozens of lucky 8th grade Algebra 1 students enthusiastically received new iPad devices, as part of a pilot of the new technology.

California Secretary of Education Bonnie Reiss joined local officials, publishers, and researchers at Washington Middle School in Long Beach for the kick-off. Built around this pilot is a scientific study designed to test the effectiveness of a new iPad-delivered Algebra textbook. Over the course of the new school year, Empirical Education researchers will compare the effect of the interactive iPad-delivered textbook to that of its conventional paper counterpart.

The new Algebra I iPad Application is published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt and features interactive lessons, videos, quizzes, problem solving, and more. While students have to flip pages in a traditional textbook to reveal answers and explanations, students using the iPad version will be able to view interactive explanations and study guides instantly by tapping on the screen. Researchers will be able to study data collected from usage logs to enhance their understanding of usage patterns.

Empirical Education is charged with conducting the study, which will incorporate the performance of over twelve hundred students from four school districts throughout California, including Long Beach, San Francisco, Riverside, and Fresno. Researchers will combine measures of math achievement and program implementation to estimate the new program’s advantage while accounting for the effects of teacher differences and other influences on implementation and student achievement. Each participating teacher has one randomly selected class using the iPads while the other classes continue with the text version of the same material.

Though the researchers haven’t come up with a way of dealing with jealousy from students who will not receive an iPad, they did come up with a fair way to choose the groups who would use the new high tech program. Classes who received iPads were determined by a random number generator.

2010-09-08

Software Industry Sets High Standards for Product Evaluation Research

The Software & Information Industry Association (SIIA) announced the release of their new report, authored by our very own Dr. Denis Newman under the direction of the SIIA Education Division’s Research & Evaluation Working Group, the guidelines provide practical considerations and share best practices of product evaluation design, conduct, and reporting. Written primarily for publishers and developers of education technology, the guidelines reflect the high standards necessary to carry out rigorous, unbiased effectiveness research. Reviewers of the guidelines included Larry Hedges with Northwestern University, Robert Slavin with Johns Hopkins University, and Talbot Bielefeldt with the International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE). A delegation of software publishers presented the Guidelines May 17 at the US Department of Education to John Q. Easton (Director of IES) and Karen Cator (Director of the Office of Education Technology). The document is now available to the public at the link above.

2010-05-13

Webinar: Uncovering ARRA’s Research Requirements

Researchers at Empirical Education provided a detailed overview of the various research themes and requirements of the ARRA stimulus initiatives with state department of education officials during their December 9 webinar entitled, “Meet Stimulus Funds’ Research Requirements with Confidence.“ The webinar gave specific examples of how states may start planning their applications and building research partnerships, as well as an overview of the ED’s current thinking about building local research capacity. The initiatives that were discussed included Race to the Top, Enhancing Education Through Technology, Investing in Innovation, Title I School Improvement Grants, and State Longitudinal Data Systems.

A follow-up webinar was broadcasted on January 20, 2010; it outlined a specific example of a program evaluation design that districts can use with existing data. The presentation can be viewed below. Stay tuned for future webinar topics on more alternative experimental research designs.

2010-01-22

Uncovering ARRA’s Research Requirements

Researchers at Empirical Education provided a detailed overview of the various research themes and requirements of the ARRA stimulus initiatives with state department of education officials during their December 9th webinar entitled, “Meet Stimulus Funds’ Research Requirements with Confidence.” The webinar gave specific examples of how states may start planning their applications, building research partnerships, as well as an overview of the ED’s current thinking about building local research capacity. The initiatives that were discussed included Race to the Top, Enhancing Education Through Technology, Investing in Innovation, Title I School Improvement Grants, and State Longitudinal Data Systems.

2009-12-17

Two-Year Study on Effectiveness of Graphing Calculators Released

Results are in from a two-year randomized control trial on the effectiveness of graphing calculators on Algebra and Geometry achievement. Two reports are now available for this project, which was sponsored by Texas Instruments. In year 1 we contrasted business as usual in the math classes of two California school districts with classes equipped with sets of graphing calculators and led by teachers who received training in their use. In the second year we contrasted calculator-only classrooms with those also equipped with a calculator-based wireless networking system.

The project tracked achievement through state and other standardized test scores and implementation through surveys and observations. For the most part, the experiment could not discern an impact as a result of providing the equipment and training for the teachers. Data from surveys and observations make clear that the technology was not used extensively (and by some, not at all) suggesting that training, usability, and alignment issues must be addressed in adoption of this kind of program. There were modest effects, especially for Geometry, but these were often not found consistently for the two measurement scales. In one case contradictory results for the two school districts suggests that researchers should use caution in combining data from different settings.

2008-03-01
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