blog posts and news stories

New Article Published on the Processes Involved with Scaling-Up or Abandoning an Innovation

Our study of scaling up an innovation that challenges conventional approaches to research is being published in the Peabody Journal of Education and is now available online at Taylor & Francis

The article, “School Processes That Can Drive Scaling-Up of an Innovation or Contribute to Its Abandonment”, looks at the drivers of school-level processes that predict the growth or the attrition of a school’s team implementing an innovation. We looked for the factors that helped to explain the school-level success or failure of a high school academic literacy framework, Reading Apprenticeship, developed by WestEd’s Strategic Literacy Initiative (SLI). The work was funded by an i3 validation grant on which we were independent evaluators. SLI had an innovative strategy for scaling-up, involving school-based cross-disciplinary teacher teams, and brought the framework to 274 schools across five states. This strategy follows research literature that views scale-up as increasing local ownership and depth of commitment. In this study, we show that there are factors working both for and against the increase of teachers and schools joining and staying in an innovation. Given wide variation in teacher uptake, we can identify processes present in the initial year that predicted gains and losses of participants.

Clicking on this link will allow you to read the abstract (and the full article if you subscribe to the journal). If you don’t already subscribe, but you would like to read the article, send us an email, and we will share with you a link that will grant you a free download of the article.

2017-10-20

Partnering with SRI and CAST on an RCT

Empirical Education and CAST are excited to announce a new partnership under an Investing in Innovation (i3) grant.

We’ll evaluate the Enhanced Units program, which was written as a development proposal by SRI and CAST. This project will aim to integrate content enhancement routines and learning and collaboration strategies, enhancements to improve student content learning, higher order reasoning, and collaboration.

We will conduct the experiment within up to three school districts in California and Virginia—working with teachers of high school science and social studies students. This is our first project with CAST, and it builds on our extensive experience conducting large-scale, rigorous, experimental impact studies, as well as formative and process evaluations.

For more information on our evaluation services and our work on i3 projects, please visit our i3 /EIR page and/or contact Robin Means.

2017-07-27

Determining the Impact of MSS on Science Achievement

Empirical Education is conducting an evaluation of Making Sense of SCIENCE (MSS) under an Investing in Innovation (i3) five-year validation grant awarded in 2014. MSS is a teacher professional learning approach that focuses on science understanding, classroom practice, literacy support, and pedagogical reasoning. The primary purpose of the evaluation is to assess the impact of MSS on teachers’ science content knowledge and student science achievement and attitudes toward science. The evaluation takes place in 66 schools across two geographic regions—Wisconsin and the Central Valley of California. Participating Local Educational Agencies (LEAs) include: Milwaukee Public Schools (WI), Racine Unified School District (WI), Lodi Unified School District (CA), Manteca Unified School District (CA), Turlock Unified School District (CA), Stockton Unified School District (CA), Sylvan Unified School District (CA), and the San Joaquin County Office of Education (CA).

Using a Randomized Control Trial (RCT) design, in 2015-16, we randomly assigned the schools (32 in Wisconsin and 34 in California) to receive the MSS intervention or continue with business-as-usual district professional learning and science instruction. Professional learning activities and program implementation take place during the 2016-17 and 2017-18 school years, with delayed treatment for the schools randomized to control, planned for 2018-19 and 2019-20.

Confirmatory impacts on student achievement and teacher content knowledge will be assessed in 2018. Confirmatory research questions include:

What is the impact of MSS at the school-level, after two years of full implementation, on science achievement in Earth and physical science among 4th and 5th grade students in intervention schools, compared to 4th and 5th grade students in control schools receiving the business-as-usual science instruction?


What is the impact of MSS on science achievement among low-achieving students in intervention elementary schools with two years of exposure to MSS (in grades 4-5) compared to low-achieving students in control elementary schools with business-as-usual instruction for two years (in grades 4-5)?

What is the impact of MSS on teachers’ science content knowledge in Earth and physical science compared to teachers in the business-as-usual control schools, after two full years of implementation in schools?

Additional exploratory analyses are currently being conducted and will continue through 2018. Exploratory research questions examine the impact of MSS on students’ ability to communicate science ideas in writing, as well as non-academic outcomes, such as confidence and engagement in learning science. We will also explore several teacher-level outcomes, including teachers’ pedagogical science content knowledge, and changes in classroom instructional practices. The evaluation also includes measures of fidelity of implementation.

We plan to publish the final results of this study in fall of 2019. Please check back to read the research summary and report.

2017-06-19

Determining the Impact of CREATE on Math and ELA Achievement

Empirical Education is conducting the evaluation of Collaboration and Reflection to Enhance Atlanta Teacher Effectiveness (CREATE) under an Investing in Innovation (i3) development grant awarded in 2014. The CREATE evaluation takes place in schools throughout the state of Georgia.

Approximately 40 residents from the Georgia State University (GSU) College of Education (COE) are participating in the CREATE teacher residency program. Using a quasi-experimental design, outcomes for these teachers and their students will be compared to those from a matched comparison group of close to 100 teachers who simultaneously enrolled in GSU COE but did not participate in CREATE. Implementation for cohort 1 started in 2015, and cohort 2 started in 2016. Confirmatory outcomes will be assessed in years 2 and 3 of both cohorts (2017 - 2019).

Confirmatory research questions we will be answering include:

What is the impact of one-year of exposure of students to a novice teacher in their second year of teacher residency in the CREATE program, compared to the Business as Usual GSU teacher credential program, on mathematics and ELA achievement of students in grades 4-8, as measured by the Georgia Milestones Assessment System?

What is the impact of CREATE on the quality of instructional strategies used by teachers, as measured by the Teacher Assessment of Performance Standards (TAPS) scores, at the end of the third year of residency, relative to the business as usual condition?

What is the impact of CREATE on the quality of the learning environment created by teachers, as measured by Teacher Assessment of Performance Standards (TAPS) scores, at the end of the third year of residency, relative to the business as usual condition?

Exploratory research questions will address additional teacher-level outcomes including retention, effectiveness, satisfaction, collaboration, and levels of stress in relationships with students and colleagues.

We plan to publish the results of this study in fall of 2019. Please check back to read the research summary and report.

2017-06-06

Report of the Evaluation of iRAISE Released

Empirical Education Inc. has completed its evaluation (read the report here) of an online professional development program for Reading Apprenticeship. WestEd’s Strategic Literacy Initiative (SLI) was awarded a development grant under the Investing in Innovation (i3) program in 2012. iRAISE (internet-based Reading Apprenticeship Improving Science Education) is an online professional development program for high school science teachers. iRAISE trained more than 100 teachers in Michigan and Pennsylvania over the three years of the grant. Empirical’s randomized control trial measured the impact of the program on students with special attention to differences in their incoming reading achievement levels.

The goal of iRAISE was to improve student achievement by training teachers in the use of Reading Apprenticeship, an instructional framework that describes the classroom in four interacting dimensions of learning: social, personal, cognitive, and knowledge-building. The inquiry-based professional development (PD) model included a week-long Foundations training in the summer; monthly synchronous group sessions and smaller personal learning communities; and asynchronous discussion groups designed to change teachers’ understanding of their role in adolescent literacy development and to build capacity for literacy instruction in the academic disciplines. iRAISE adapted an earlier face-to-face version of Reading Apprenticeship professional development, which was studied under an earlier i3 grant, Reading Apprenticeship Improving Secondary Education (RAISE), into a completely online course, creating a flexible, accessible platform.

To evaluate iRAISE, Empirical Education conducted an experiment in which 82 teachers across 27 schools were randomly assigned to either receive the iRAISE Professional Development during the 2014-15 school year or continue with business as usual and receive the program one year later. Data collection included monthly teacher surveys that measured their use of several classroom instructional practices and a spring administration of an online literacy assessment, developed by Educational Testing Service, to measure student achievement in literacy. We found significant positive impacts of iRAISE on several of the classroom practice outcomes, including teachers providing explicit instruction on comprehension strategies, their use of metacognitive inquiry strategies, and their levels of confidence in literacy instruction. These results were consistent with the prior RAISE research study and are an important replication of the previous findings, as they substantiate the success of SLI’s development of a more accessible online version of their teacher PD. After a one-year implementation with iRAISE, we do not find an overall effect of the program on student literacy achievement. However, we did find that levels of incoming reading achievement moderate the impact of iRAISE on general reading literacy such that lower scoring students benefit more. The success of iRAISE in adapting immersive, high-quality professional development to an online platform is promising for the field.

You can access the report and research summary from the study using the links below.
iRAISE research report
iRAISE research summary

2016-07-01

Five-year evaluation of Reading Apprenticeship i3 implementation reported at SREE

Empirical Education has released two research reports on the scale-up and impact of Reading Apprenticeship, as implemented under one of the first cohorts of Investing in Innovation (i3) grants. The Reading Apprenticeship Improving Secondary Education (RAISE) project reached approximately 2,800 teachers in five states with a program providing teacher professional development in content literacy in three disciplines: science, history, and English language arts. RAISE supported Empirical Education and our partner, IMPAQ International, in evaluating the innovation through both a randomized control trial encompassing 42 schools and a systematic study of the scale-up of 239 schools. The RCT found significant impact on student achievement in science classes consistent with prior studies. Mean impact across subjects, while positive, did not reach the .05 level of significance. The scale-up study found evidence that the strategy of building cross-disciplinary teacher teams within the school is associated with growth and sustainability of the program. Both sides of the evaluation were presented at the annual conference of the Society for Research on Educational Effectiveness, March 6-8, 2016 in Washington DC. Cheri Fancsali (formerly of IMPAQ, now at Research Alliance for NYC Schools) presented results of the RCT. Denis Newman (Empirical) presented a comparison of RAISE as instantiated in the RCT and scale-up contexts.

You can access the reports and research summaries from the studies using the links below.
RAISE RCT research report
RAISE RCT research summary
RAISE Scale-up research report
RAISE Scale-up research summary

2016-03-09

Evaluation Concludes Aspire’s PD Tools Show Promise to Impact Classroom Practice

Empirical Education Inc. has completed an independent evaluation (read the report here) of a set of tools and professional development opportunities developed and implemented by Aspire Public Schools under an Investing in Innovation (i3) grant. Aspire was awarded the development grant in the 2011 funding cycle and put the system, Transforming Teacher Talent (t3), into operation in 2013 in their 35 California schools. The goal of t3 was to improve teacher practice as measured by the Aspire Instructional Rubric (AIR) and thereby improve student outcomes on the California Standards Test (CST), the state assessment. Some of the t3 components connected the AIR scores from classroom observations to individualized professional development materials building on tools from BloomBoard, Inc.

To evaluate t3, Empirical principal investigator, Andrew Jaciw and his team designed the strongest feasible evaluation. Since it was not possible to split the schools into two groups by having two versions of Aspire’s technology infrastructure supporting t3, a randomized experiment or other comparison group design was not feasible. Working with the National Evaluation of i3 (NEi3) team, Empirical developed a correlational design comparing two years of teacher AIR scores and student CST scores; that is, from the 2012-13 school year to the scores in the first year of implementation, 2013-14. Because the state was in a transition to new Common Core tests, the evaluation was unable to collect student outcomes systematically. The AIR scores, however, provided evidence of substantial overall improvement with an effect size of 0.581 standard deviations (p <.001). The evidence meets the standards for “evidence-based” as defined in the recently enacted Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), which requires, at the least, that the test of the intervention “demonstrates a statistically significant effect on improving…relevant outcomes based on…promising evidence from at least 1 well designed and well-implemented correlational study with statistical controls for selection bias.” A demonstration of promise can assist in obtaining federal and other funding.

2016-03-07

SREE Spring 2016 Conference Presentations

We are excited to be presenting two topics at the annual Spring Conference of The Society for Research on Educational Effectiveness (SREE) next week. Our first presentation addresses the problem of using multiple pieces of evidence to support decisions. Our second presentation compares the context of an RCT with schools implementing the same program without those constraints. If you’re at SREE, we hope to run into you, either at one of these presentations (details below) or at one of yours.

Friday, March 4, 2016 from 3:30 - 5PM
Roosevelt (“TR”) - Ritz-Carlton Hotel, Ballroom Level

6E. Evaluating Educational Policies and Programs
Evidence-Based Decision-Making and Continuous Improvement

Chair: Robin Wisniewski, RTI International

Does “What Works”, Work for Me?: Translating Causal Impact Findings from Multiple RCTs of a Program to Support Decision-Making
Andrew P. Jaciw, Denis Newman, Val Lazarev, & Boya Ma, Empirical Education



Saturday, March 5, 2016 from 10AM - 12PM
Culpeper - Fairmont Hotel, Ballroom Level

Session 8F: Evaluating Educational Policies and Programs & International Perspectives on Educational Effectiveness
The Challenge of Scale: Evidence from Charters, Vouchers, and i3

Chair: Ash Vasudeva, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation

Comparing a Program Implemented under the Constraints of an RCT and in the Wild
Denis Newman, Valeriy Lazarev, & Jenna Zacamy, Empirical Education

2016-02-26

Meeting Long-time Friends and New Partners at #i3PD2015

Empirical sent five staff members to the Invest in Innovation (i3) Project Director’s meeting in Washington to support the five i3 evaluations we are currently conducting. Denis Newman, Andrew Jaciw, Jenna Zacamy, Megan Toby and Adam Schellinger. The meetings were filled with formal and informal meetings with partners, members of the i3 technical assistance teams, and old friends. Projects we are currently evaluating are RAISE, Aspire Public Schools, iRAISE, Making Sense of Science, and CREATE. We are currently at work on proposals for the 2016 round of awards.

2015-06-10

Empirical to Evaluate Two More Winning i3 Projects

U.S. Department of Education has announced the highest-rated applicants for the 2014 Investing in Innovation (i3) competition. Of the 434 submissions received by ED, we are excited that both of the proposals for which we developed evaluation plans were among the 26 winners. Both of these proposals were THE highest rated in their respective categories!

In one, we’ll be partnering with WestEd to evaluate the Making Sense of Science and Literacy program. Written as a validation proposal, this 5-year project will aim to strengthen teachers’ content knowledge, transform classroom practices, and boost student achievement.

The other highest-rated application was a development proposal submitted by the Atlanta Neighborhood Charter Schools. In this 5-year project, we will assess its 3-year residency model on the effectiveness of early career teachers.

Both projects were bid under the “priority” for teacher effectiveness. We have a long standing partnership with WestEd on i3 evaluations and Regional Lab projects. This is our first project with Atlanta Neighborhood Charter Schools, and it builds on our educator effectiveness work and our ongoing partnerships with charter schools, including our evaluation of an i3 Development effort by Aspire Public Schools.

For more information on our evaluation services and our work on i3 projects, please visit our i3 page and/or contact Robin Means.

2014-11-07
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